Posts Tagged ‘homosexuality’

The fact that our country has taken the turn that it has is quite deplorable, but Christians, let’s face it, Romans 8:28 should be our comfort, and Isaiah 35:4 , Deuteronomy 31:6 our strength.

 

Here are a couple of quotes from an article that I believe is very real in its assessment of current events.

 

“These threats may bring about in the church a much-needed change of mindset. It’s time we recognized we are no longer the “moral majority” and embrace our identity as the “missional minority.”

My friends in Great Britain and Romania tell me it’s a noble task to serve Christ when you are clearly in the minority. Though the challenges often seem insurmountable, God’s people have the opportunity to learn how to love those who oppose us, to serve and suffer under governmental or cultural bigotry, and face hatred with respect and kindness. So let’s recognize our minority status and learn to serve those who we’re called to show God’s love.”

 

Read the whole article here: Why Gay Marriage is Good and Bad for the Church

 

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Sin has consequences. Yet Chesterton always maintains that we must condemn the sin and not the sinner. 

That is another reason we must treat our homosexual brothers and sisters with compassion. We know our own sins and weaknesses well enough. Philo of Alexandria said, “Be kind. Everyone you meet is fighting a terrible battle.” But compassion must never compromise with evil. Chesterton points out that balance that our truth must not be pitiless, but neither can our pity be untruthful. Homosexuality is a disorder. It is contrary to order. Homosexual acts are sinful, that is, they are contrary to God’s order. They can never be normal. And worse yet, they can never even be even. As Chesterton’s great detective Father Brown says:  “Men may keep a sort of level of good, but no man has ever been able to keep on one level of evil. That road goes down and down.”

But it was heterosexual men and women who paved the way to this decay. Divorce, which is an abnormal thing, is now treated as normal. Contraception, another abnormal thing, is now treated as normal. Abortion is still not normal, but it is legal. Making homosexual “marriage” legal will not make it normal, but it will add to the confusion of the times. And it will add to the downward spiral of our civilization. But Chesterton’s prophecy remains: We will not be able to destroy the family. We will merely destroy ourselves by disregarding the family.

G. K. Chesterton: It’s Not Gay, and It’s Not Marriage:

http://www.crisismagazine.com/2013/g-k-chesterton-its-not-gay-and-its-not-marriage

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“My Train Wreck Conversion” is the second article I’ve read this month written by a gay or lesbian. The first was Shane Windmeyer, leader of  LGBT, opening up about his friendship with Dan Cathy, president of Chick-fil-a. This article by Rosaria Butterfield is about how a pastor and his wife befriended her. What is something both these friendships had in common? The Christians, while never wavering in their convictions that homosexuality is a sin, did not start by mocking and condemning them. In fact, Rosaria tells us how Ken acted:

He did not mock. He engaged. So when his letter invited me to get together for dinner, I accepted. My motives at the time were straightforward: Surely this will be good for my research.

Something else happened. Ken and his wife, Floy, and I became friends. They entered my world. They met my friends. We did book exchanges. We talked openly about sexuality and politics. They did not act as if such conversations were polluting them. They did not treat me like a blank slate. When we ate together, Ken prayed in a way I had never heard before. His prayers were intimate. Vulnerable. He repented of his sin in front of me. He thanked God for all things. Ken’s God was holy and firm, yet full of mercy. And because Ken and Floy did not invite me to church, I knew it was safe to be friends.

Many Christians avoid homosexuals like the plague. There is very little kindness or generosity shown to them, only a direct confrontation of their sin. Perhaps, as these two individuals demonstrate, a much better witness to Christianity is to befriend them, set the foundation of a relationship, and through your actions and conversations show Christ-like love and forgiveness to them. Before calling them names and automatically sending them to Hell in your book, recall that it was not to the prostitutes that Jesus called names but to the Pharisees, those who considered themselves holy. (Matt 23:15-34 for anyone who wants to read up on that).

Read the rest of Rasaria Butterfield’s testimony here:

http://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/2013/january-february/my-train-wreck-conversion.html?start=1

 

And Shane Windmeyer’s here:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/shane-l-windmeyer/dan-cathy-chick-fil-a_b_2564379.html

 

 

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